nerdbause:

deznaomi:

bulletproofwithoutthevest:

imsoshive:

nzurianne:

kidxforever:

Katt Williams: Dave Chappelle Is Funnier Than Me

Yooooooo this shit gets deep

Damn damn damn …

damn …

real REAL deep

Oh.My.God. This is really scary when you think about it, and the more I think about it, the more I’m getting pissed off.  You guys need to see this

Damnnnnnnn……. 😱

(via blackourstory)

dynastylnoire:

thighhighs:

You’ve probably never heard of Jackie Ormes and that’s a goddamn tragedy. But it’s not surprising—there is no “Jackie Ormes Omnibus” available on Amazon.com, no “Collected Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger,” no “Essential Torchy Brown.” She won no awards, can be found in no hall of fame, and is usually treated as “an interesting find” by comic historians. She’s become a curio, a funny little facet of history, undiscovered, even, by today’s wave of geek-oriented feminism.

Jackie Ormes was the first African-American woman cartoonist. Yeah. That’s who we’re ignoring. Her work for the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender—both incredibly influential African-American newspapers—was utterly groundbreaking and remains unique, even in the context of modern comics. Her first work, Torchy Brown in Dixie to Harlem, featured the adventures of the titular Torchy, a stylish, intelligent young African-American woman who (feigning illiteracy) boards a whites-only train car to New York City and changes her life. Torchy’s story is a great, irreverent window into the migration of Southern-born African-Americans to the North, a movement that defined 20th-century America—but it is also the story of a girl on her own, living her own life and making her own choices. Torchy was an incredible aspirational figure, the likes of which barley exists in modern comics: an independent, optimistic, fashionable and adventurous black woman. Ormes would later revive Torchy’s story in Torchy in Heartbeats, a strip that introduced international adventure into the heroine’s life. In Heartbeats, Torchy traveled to South America, dated idealistic doctors, battled environmental exploitation and confronted racism at every turn. She was, frankly, awesome

And then there was Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger, her most successful and longest-running work. Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger was a single panel gag strip, like Family Circus—an illustration with a caption beneath it. Ginger was a beautiful, stylish young woman always accompanied by her little sister Patty-Jo, a clear-eyed, sardonic kid who spent most strips calling out the bullshit they endured on a daily basis as black women. Ormes’ talents shine through especially well in these little stories: her canny wit, the absolutely gorgeous clothes she drew her women in (seen also in her Torchy Togs paper dolls) and her skillful, succinct way of imparting to the reader just how goddamn stupid our society can be about gender and race. Patty-Jo is never shamed or taken down a peg for being an intelligent, outspoken little girl—in fact, she was made into a highly popular doll that wasn’t an obnoxious Topsy-style stereotype. She preceded Daria, Emily the Strange, Lian Harper, all those wry little girls we celebrate today—and yet, I see her on no t-shirts, can find her in no libraries. Patty-Jo is celebrated only in doll-collecting circles at this point, as the cute little symbol of a bygone age.

At Jackie Ormes’ height as a cartoonist, her work reached one million people per week. In the 1940s and 1950s, she reached one million people per week. She didn’t just surpass barriers—she leapt merrily over them. She introduced the general populace to a voice that had always existed, but was seldom heard—a voice that is still smothered today. She created African-American women who unapologetically enjoyed glamour, who pioneered their own futures, who refused to keep silent about the walls they found themselves scraping against every day. I haven’t even covered the half of it: Ormes was also an avid doll collector, served on the founding board of directors of the DuSable Museum of African-American history, and was targeted by the McCarthy-led witchhunts of the 1950s. Remember Jackie Ormes. Celebrate Jackie Ormes. Visit The Ormes Society and support the essential work they do. Keep her memory alive so that we may enjoy a million more Torchys and Patty-Jos in our comics—instead of the paltry handful we are offered today.

(First in a series on women in the comics industry.)

PITTSBURGH!

(via numinousnegrita)

Power feminism is just another scam in which women get to play patriarchs and pretend that the power we seek and gain liberates us.

bell hooks

Let’s talk about this quote for a second.

I remember I attended a college lecture about what feminism means in America and how imperial politics and economic gaps between the West and East render what women want and consider pivotal to their feminism as conflicting and even antagonistic to each other.

My feminism, first and foremost, will always be anti-imperialism.

Imperial politics are dangerous and the very essence of narcissism. Imperial politics demonstrated within a feminist frame usually goes as follows: the most privileged women, ie. those who have access to technology, representation, occupy a particular media-friendly image or ideology and have access to those in higher slots in society are allotted platforms to speak about their experiences as women and without question, this gets presumptuously labelled “women’s experiences”. Being that women who are globally bestowed the highest tier are usually allowed such room to speak, their minimal struggles are then homogenized as the quintessential female experience and misogyny is wholeheartedly announced a tangible issue that can be easily eradicated out of modern Western society.

Its no accident that women of color, women in occupied regions and those who face mass political or economic repression and their words which don’t satisfy neoliberal, imperialist gaze are deemed anti-progressive, race baiters, backwards, terrorist apologists, etc. Our complex, multi-faceted struggles within a white supremacist empire tap into too many accepted status quos for the average American moderate. It forces those who legitimize the war on terror and view racism as an entity of the past to confront their own unsightly prejudices and the systematic brutality their nations enacts on various global societies, as well as within its borders. Its easier to find (and fabricate) any reason to demonize the likes of Trayvon Martin and his family for his own tragic demise or deem young Yemeni children necessary collateral damage for “the greater good” than to examine what other oppressions beyond misogyny exist that unquestionably burden the lives of otherized communities, including and especially the women in said communities.

Power feminism expects women to unanimously rejoice in the presidential election of Hillary Clinton, while her administration carries out the same murderous policies as her predecessors. Power feminism labels any legitimate criticism of influential women as inherent egregious misogyny. Power feminism devalues the loss of women’s lives abroad, while infantizling their independent resistance and stripping their agency by shamelessly declaring intervention as saving them. Power feminism within an imperialistic frame needs the hyper-demonization of otherized communities to justify its occupation. Power feminism can be even more dangerous than ruthless misogyny because of its insidious nature and lack of culpability.

(via maarnayeri)

THIS POST IS GOLDEN (via wocinsolidarity)

(via myownwayismine)

the-friction-in-your-jeans:

So I just learned more about slavery in 15 minutes than I did in my entire time in the education system!

(via blackourstory)

wussut:

residentgoodgirl:

Protect little black boys at all costs

The notes on this are dissapointing.

Even with the knowledge that notes do nothing for the actual protection of black boys, it strikes as uncomfortable when compared to similar posts.

(via myownwayismine)

queenofthesideeye:

houseofmack:

medievalpoc:

Toni Morrison
[“The function, the very serious function of racism, is distraction. It keeps you from doing your work. It keeps you explaining, over and over again, your reason for being. Somebody says you have no language, so you spend twenty years proving that you do. Somebody says your head isn’t shaped properly, so you have scientists working on the fact that it is. Someone says you have no art, so you dredge that up. Somebody says you have no kingdoms, so you dredge that up. None of that is necessary. There will always be one more thing.” -Toni Morrison]
Wow. I swear, every time Toni Morrison opens her mouth, truth that cuts to the core falls out.
This quote resonates with me because so much of what I want to happen here has to do with removing a lot of the racist assumption about history in so that others can just get on with it. Even if you don’t like what I write, the images, links, books, and resources are still here to link to, rather than constantly being bombarded with and distracted by demands for “education”, “proof” that racism exists, or anything else anyone might need it for.
Whether you’re writing, making visual art, working in education, or just trying to have a conversation, it’s my hope that this blog might help remove some of the distractions of racism as defined above, and do your thing.

So well said. 
If you want to hear the entire program from which this quote comes, Portland State released the audio via Soundcloud, and I’ve posted a downloadable transcript on my site. 
The audio is 2 hours long, and well worth your time. 

Omg! Thank you so much for your gift of transcription. I just printed and will be reading and highlighting during my chaperone duties :)

queenofthesideeye:

houseofmack:

medievalpoc:

Toni Morrison

[“The function, the very serious function of racism, is distraction. It keeps you from doing your work. It keeps you explaining, over and over again, your reason for being. Somebody says you have no language, so you spend twenty years proving that you do. Somebody says your head isn’t shaped properly, so you have scientists working on the fact that it is. Someone says you have no art, so you dredge that up. Somebody says you have no kingdoms, so you dredge that up. None of that is necessary. There will always be one more thing.” -Toni Morrison]

Wow. I swear, every time Toni Morrison opens her mouth, truth that cuts to the core falls out.

This quote resonates with me because so much of what I want to happen here has to do with removing a lot of the racist assumption about history in so that others can just get on with it. Even if you don’t like what I write, the images, links, books, and resources are still here to link to, rather than constantly being bombarded with and distracted by demands for “education”, “proof” that racism exists, or anything else anyone might need it for.

Whether you’re writing, making visual art, working in education, or just trying to have a conversation, it’s my hope that this blog might help remove some of the distractions of racism as defined above, and do your thing.

So well said. 

If you want to hear the entire program from which this quote comes, Portland State released the audio via Soundcloud, and I’ve posted a downloadable transcript on my site. 

The audio is 2 hours long, and well worth your time. 

Omg! Thank you so much for your gift of transcription. I just printed and will be reading and highlighting during my chaperone duties :)

(via numinousnegrita)

sextoyconfessions:

elizabethclaret:

gradientlair:

Three fabulous Black ballerinas, Ashley Murphy, Ebony Williams and Misty Copeland are on the cover of Pointe for June/July 2014. Stunning cover. They’re so beautiful. I’ve never bought a ballet magazine but I want a copy of this to read their story and to keep. ❤
Oh and their brown pointe shoes. IMPORTANT. 

I never realized pointe shoes were meant to match your skin tone. It makes perfect sense now, but it seriously never occurred to me, because all the pointe shoes I’ve ever seen were pink or some shade of pink/white.
Yay for learning something new today! Boo for having to learn it because of a lack of representation of people of color in ballet…. well, fucking everywhere, but in this specific case…

Yeah, they were always “flesh” coloured to accentuate and elongate the legs…. Growing up, I always hated having to either wear pink or black shoes because it just didn’t have the same look and made me stick out even more. 

sextoyconfessions:

elizabethclaret:

gradientlair:

Three fabulous Black ballerinas, Ashley Murphy, Ebony Williams and Misty Copeland are on the cover of Pointe for June/July 2014. Stunning cover. They’re so beautiful. I’ve never bought a ballet magazine but I want a copy of this to read their story and to keep. 

Oh and their brown pointe shoes. IMPORTANT. 

I never realized pointe shoes were meant to match your skin tone. It makes perfect sense now, but it seriously never occurred to me, because all the pointe shoes I’ve ever seen were pink or some shade of pink/white.

Yay for learning something new today! Boo for having to learn it because of a lack of representation of people of color in ballet…. well, fucking everywhere, but in this specific case…

Yeah, they were always “flesh” coloured to accentuate and elongate the legs…. Growing up, I always hated having to either wear pink or black shoes because it just didn’t have the same look and made me stick out even more. 

(via numinousnegrita)

yourpersonalcheerleader:

studentsforaffirmativeaction:

Because white women are the primary beneficiaries of affirmative action, but no one calls that “special treatment”. #RaceMatters

You go girl. Exactly!

yourpersonalcheerleader:

studentsforaffirmativeaction:

Because white women are the primary beneficiaries of affirmative action, but no one calls that “special treatment”. #RaceMatters

You go girl. Exactly!

(via fyeahcracker)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Typography, Art and Posters You May Have Missed
Art posted during Gay Pride Weekend, Portland, Maine in late(r)-2000s
(Source: Down Is Not Up)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Typography, Art and Posters You May Have Missed

Art posted during Gay Pride Weekend, Portland, Maine in late(r)-2000s

(Source: Down Is Not Up)

(via projectqueer)

fyeahcracker:

how can so many white people love “the breakfast club” so much but not understand the power dynamics of racism in the same way that they understand that film?

Read More

marxvx:

assdownloader:

"don’t support nestle!" shouts the liberal on the computer made from parts manufactured at foxconn

consumer activism is a lie, see you in hell or in communism

lmao try boycotting a brand in monopoly capitalism

image

(via eshusplayground)

pallet-town-julie-brown:

america-wakiewakie:

america-wakiewakie:

WHAT TO DO ABOUT GAZA
I have seen a lot of people in my life, myself included, going through hard times right now with the extreme escalation of colonial violence in Palestine. People are sad, angry, and praying. Many people are overwhelmed. Worried for our families. Many people in our communities are learning more about Palestine for the first time, and want to know ways to connect. It’s hard to know what to do from so far away, and easy to feel helpless when you don’t know what to do.
This list is for all of us, to recommit to the work we’ve been doing, to get grounded when this massacre has knocked us off our feet, and to get connected where we haven’t been before.
Please share with your communities!
1. BDS – BOYCOTT, DIVESTMENT, & SANCTIONS
Boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) is a movement that was called for by Palestinian civil society. It is a grassroots, nonviolent form of resistance that there are so many ways to participate in.
Here is the Palestinian Civil Society Call for Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions.
Divestment: 
Get involved with (or start) a campaign for your university, workplace, union, etc. to pull out its investments in companies that are connected to Israeli human rights offenses. 
Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) has led many successful divestment campaigns at universities across the country, (click here to get involved). 
We Divest is a project of Jewish Voice for Peace, which has successfully pressured TIAA-CREF around its occupation investments (click here to get involved). 
Consumer Boycott:
Here is a quick list of companies that profit from Israeli human rights offenses.
Consumer boycott is about individually deciding not to buy these products, but it’s also about popular education. Flyering to educate people about what’s behind this stuff. Encouraging local shops not to sell these products. There are ongoing successful consumer boycott campaigns against SodaStream and Sabra Hummus, for example.Cultural and Academic Boycott:
As artists and academics, it’s very important that we decolonize the way we produce our work, and don’t let it be used to normalize violent structures.
There is a set of guidelines for cultural and academic boycott from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) that artists and academics can sign on to (Academic boycott guidelines here & Cultural boycott guidelines here). 
If you are an Israeli citizen, you can also sign the Boycott from Within statement, and get involved with their work (click here to get involved).
An excellent resource, which can help you find information for whichever kind of BDS campaign you decide to get involved with, is the Who Profits? database.
2. DONATE
Donating money is not an action that everyone can afford to get involved with, but if you have even a small amount to spare, here are some great places to donate to:
Middle East Children’s AlliancePalestinian Center for Human RightsAmerican Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA)United Palestinian Appeal
3. PARTICIPATE IN LOCAL PROTESTS & VIGILS
Protests and vigils are a great way to make the Palestinian struggle visible in your city, and also to build community with other people who are feeling the same way you are.
If you go to a protest, come through with good friends that you can trust, and have a plan for what to do if police or counterprotestors escalate.For organizers: Palestinian liberation is connected so intricately with all of our liberation. Reach out to members of other oppressed communities and build coalitions, feature their voices at your demonstration (for example, African, Latin@, and Indigenous activists). Keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work.
4. MAKE ART! & SUPPORT ARTISTS
This is giving us a whole lot of feelings, right?! Write/draw/paint/act/sing/print/dance it out! Bring attention to Gaza and Palestine within your artistic communities.
Endorse the USACBI statement, commit to its principles. Educate other artists you know about it, and encourage them to sign as well. Tell your story and tell it true. Be ethical and accountable in the way you handle the stories of others.
If you are not an artist: Help support Palestinian artists, and artists from other communities in struggle against Israeli apartheid. Donate, purchase work, host events, for example.
5. CHECK YOURSELF
Make sure that the information you have is accurate. Behind every single news story is a human being with a life as full as your own, and you owe it to them to get the facts straight. Do not re-post gory images of dead children on social media with no context—this is extremely disrespectful.
Below are a few (but not the only) reliable English-language news sources:
Palestinian Centre for Human RightsThe Electronic IntifadaAl Jazeera EnglishMa’an News AgencyJadaliyya
Read and understand the BDS call, and its demands and guidelines, and do not present false information about it. This is very important, because oftentimes even people who are part of the Palestine solidarity movement can misunderstand the guidelines, and fall for Zionist misinformation about them. Read the calls for yourself and figure out how you can plug in. (see above for the guidelines). Think about what your role is in this movement. 
Ask yourself some questions before you take action:
What is your relationship to Israeli apartheid historically, and the recent colonial violence?
What are you directly complicit in and what can you do to address that?
Who are you being accountable to?
Amplify the voices of, and support people who are more directly impacted than you. Step back when you need to and when you are told to. Avoid false and oppressive binaries, like Arab/Jew. Remember that Israeli apartheid is a multi-layered system, and bring that understanding to your work. Think about your social position in the country where you’re doing this work, and consistently check yourself on this, too. Again, keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work. Don’t judge people for not being able to take part in the same forms of resistance as you.
6. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF & EACH OTHER
Mourn the dead. Speak their names. Publicly and privately. Do rituals if this helps you.
Read/watch/listen to/share poems/music/film/art by Palestinian artists.
Make art. (even if you are not “an artist.”)
Write it out. (even if you are not “a writer.”)
Cook Palestinian food. Share it with your loved ones.
Take time and space to feel.
Lean on your friends and let them lean on you.
Tune out the news if you need to. (Keep the news on, if you need to be reassured by the steady flow of information.)
Don’t go to protests/demos/events alone.
Take alone time if you need it.
Turn to your faith if that helps you.
Stay committed to healing, and recognize healing as part of the work.
If you are close with them, stay in touch with your family and friends in Palestine.
Remember, it is not your responsibility to educate your oppressors!
Keep checking yourself. 
“We teach life, sir” by Rafeef Ziadah 
“What I Will” by Suheir Hammad
Affirm life. Affirm life. Affirm life.
Editor’s Note: This submission’s author wished to remain anonymous. Feel free to add to this list upon sharing, and please, please, signal boost!

Signal boost one more time!

This is great

pallet-town-julie-brown:

america-wakiewakie:

america-wakiewakie:

WHAT TO DO ABOUT GAZA

I have seen a lot of people in my life, myself included, going through hard times right now with the extreme escalation of colonial violence in Palestine. People are sad, angry, and praying. Many people are overwhelmed. Worried for our families. Many people in our communities are learning more about Palestine for the first time, and want to know ways to connect. It’s hard to know what to do from so far away, and easy to feel helpless when you don’t know what to do.

This list is for all of us, to recommit to the work we’ve been doing, to get grounded when this massacre has knocked us off our feet, and to get connected where we haven’t been before.

Please share with your communities!

1. BDS – BOYCOTT, DIVESTMENT, & SANCTIONS

Boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) is a movement that was called for by Palestinian civil society. It is a grassroots, nonviolent form of resistance that there are so many ways to participate in.

Here is the Palestinian Civil Society Call for Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions.

Divestment: 

Get involved with (or start) a campaign for your university, workplace, union, etc. to pull out its investments in companies that are connected to Israeli human rights offenses. 

Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) has led many successful divestment campaigns at universities across the country, (click here to get involved). 

We Divest is a project of Jewish Voice for Peace, which has successfully pressured TIAA-CREF around its occupation investments (click here to get involved). 

Consumer Boycott:

Here is a quick list of companies that profit from Israeli human rights offenses.

Consumer boycott is about individually deciding not to buy these products, but it’s also about popular education. Flyering to educate people about what’s behind this stuff. Encouraging local shops not to sell these products. There are ongoing successful consumer boycott campaigns against SodaStream and Sabra Hummus, for example.
Cultural and Academic Boycott:

As artists and academics, it’s very important that we decolonize the way we produce our work, and don’t let it be used to normalize violent structures.

There is a set of guidelines for cultural and academic boycott from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) that artists and academics can sign on to (Academic boycott guidelines here & Cultural boycott guidelines here). 

If you are an Israeli citizen, you can also sign the Boycott from Within statement, and get involved with their work (click here to get involved).

An excellent resource, which can help you find information for whichever kind of BDS campaign you decide to get involved with, is the Who Profits? database.

2. DONATE

Donating money is not an action that everyone can afford to get involved with, but if you have even a small amount to spare, here are some great places to donate to:

Middle East Children’s Alliance
Palestinian Center for Human Rights
American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA)
United Palestinian Appeal

3. PARTICIPATE IN LOCAL PROTESTS & VIGILS

Protests and vigils are a great way to make the Palestinian struggle visible in your city, and also to build community with other people who are feeling the same way you are.

If you go to a protest, come through with good friends that you can trust, and have a plan for what to do if police or counterprotestors escalate.
For organizers: Palestinian liberation is connected so intricately with all of our liberation. Reach out to members of other oppressed communities and build coalitions, feature their voices at your demonstration (for example, African, Latin@, and Indigenous activists). Keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work.

4. MAKE ART! & SUPPORT ARTISTS

This is giving us a whole lot of feelings, right?! Write/draw/paint/act/sing/print/dance it out! Bring attention to Gaza and Palestine within your artistic communities.

Endorse the USACBI statement, commit to its principles. Educate other artists you know about it, and encourage them to sign as well. 
Tell your story and tell it true. Be ethical and accountable in the way you handle the stories of others.

If you are not an artist: Help support Palestinian artists, and artists from other communities in struggle against Israeli apartheid. Donate, purchase work, host events, for example.

5. CHECK YOURSELF

Make sure that the information you have is accurate. Behind every single news story is a human being with a life as full as your own, and you owe it to them to get the facts straight. Do not re-post gory images of dead children on social media with no context—this is extremely disrespectful.

Below are a few (but not the only) reliable English-language news sources:

Palestinian Centre for Human Rights
The Electronic Intifada
Al Jazeera English
Ma’an News Agency
Jadaliyya

Read and understand the BDS call, and its demands and guidelines, and do not present false information about it. This is very important, because oftentimes even people who are part of the Palestine solidarity movement can misunderstand the guidelines, and fall for Zionist misinformation about them. Read the calls for yourself and figure out how you can plug in. (see above for the guidelines). Think about what your role is in this movement.

Ask yourself some questions before you take action:

  • What is your relationship to Israeli apartheid historically, and the recent colonial violence?
  • What are you directly complicit in and what can you do to address that?
  • Who are you being accountable to?

Amplify the voices of, and support people who are more directly impacted than you. Step back when you need to and when you are told to. Avoid false and oppressive binaries, like Arab/Jew. Remember that Israeli apartheid is a multi-layered system, and bring that understanding to your work. Think about your social position in the country where you’re doing this work, and consistently check yourself on this, too. Again, keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work. Don’t judge people for not being able to take part in the same forms of resistance as you.

6. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF & EACH OTHER

  • Mourn the dead. Speak their names. Publicly and privately. Do rituals if this helps you.
  • Read/watch/listen to/share poems/music/film/art by Palestinian artists.
  • Make art. (even if you are not “an artist.”)
  • Write it out. (even if you are not “a writer.”)
  • Cook Palestinian food. Share it with your loved ones.
  • Take time and space to feel.
  • Lean on your friends and let them lean on you.
  • Tune out the news if you need to. (Keep the news on, if you need to be reassured by the steady flow of information.)
  • Don’t go to protests/demos/events alone.
  • Take alone time if you need it.
  • Turn to your faith if that helps you.
  • Stay committed to healing, and recognize healing as part of the work.
  • If you are close with them, stay in touch with your family and friends in Palestine.
  • Remember, it is not your responsibility to educate your oppressors!
  • Keep checking yourself. 
  • “We teach life, sir” by Rafeef Ziadah 
  • “What I Will” by Suheir Hammad
  • Affirm life. Affirm life. Affirm life.

Editor’s Note: This submission’s author wished to remain anonymous. Feel free to add to this list upon sharing, and please, please, signal boost!

Signal boost one more time!

This is great