susiethemoderator:

afrikan-centered-education:

The Greeks and Romans made their Gods and Godessess straight from Kemet’s God and Goddesses 
Kemet’s God and Goddesses renamed in Identity……One by One History proves quite convincingly that the Gods and Goddesses of Europeans were of African origin but given European names… Lets go through the Academics:*The African God, Amun, was renamed Zeus by the Greeks and Jupiter by the Romans; *The African God, Heru (the son of God and associated with light and sun) was called Apollo by both the Greeks and the Romans; *The African God Imhotep (the God of Healing and medicine) was renamed Asclepius by the Greeks and Aesclapius by the Romans; *The African God Djhuti/Thoth (God of Science, Writing and Knowledge) was called Hermes by the Greeks and Mercury by the Romans; *The African God, Pluto, was called Pluto by both the Greeks and Romans; the *The African God, Ausar, (the God of resurrection) was renamed Osiris by the Greeks; *The African Goddess Hathor (the Goddess of love and beauty) was called Aphrodite by the Greeks and Venus by the Romans; and *The African Goddess Ist (Auset), (Goddess of maternity), was renamed Isis and was worshiped as the “Black Madonna.”

Interesting… All these statuses noses “fell” off….

susiethemoderator:

afrikan-centered-education:

The Greeks and Romans made their Gods and Godessess straight from Kemet’s God and Goddesses 


Kemet’s God and Goddesses renamed in Identity……One by One 

History proves quite convincingly that the Gods and Goddesses of Europeans were of African origin but given European names… 

Lets go through the Academics:

*The African God, Amun, was renamed Zeus by the Greeks and Jupiter by the Romans; 

*The African God, Heru (the son of God and associated with light and sun) was called Apollo by both the Greeks and the Romans; 

*The African God Imhotep (the God of Healing and medicine) was renamed Asclepius by the Greeks and Aesclapius by the Romans; 

*The African God Djhuti/Thoth (God of Science, Writing and Knowledge) was called Hermes by the Greeks and Mercury by the Romans; 

*The African God, Pluto, was called Pluto by both the Greeks and Romans; the 

*The African God, Ausar, (the God of resurrection) was renamed Osiris by the Greeks; 

*The African Goddess Hathor (the Goddess of love and beauty) was called Aphrodite by the Greeks and Venus by the Romans; and 

*The African Goddess Ist (Auset), (Goddess of maternity), was renamed Isis and was worshiped as the “Black Madonna.”

Interesting… All these statuses noses “fell” off….

(via reverseracism)

femmelillies:

wes gibbins is so important to me rn and it’s not even because he’s cute af. but because he is a black boy who is timid and quirky and unsure of himself. it has always annoyed me that so many roles black men get have them portrayed as smooth-talking, philanderers with over inflated egos.

like, shy black boys exist. and they are precious. and america needs to know this. 

theultraintrovert:

anomaly1:

Raising black children

My Umi would always apply this scene to police brutality and Black children

(via cleophatrajones)

scienceyoucanlove:

10 Black Scientists You Should Know

by 

1. Ernest Everett Just

In 1916, Ernest Everett Just became the first black man to earn a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in experimental embryology, but perhaps his greatest legacy is the sheer amount of scientific papers he authored during his career.

Just was born in 1883 and raised in Charleston, S.C., where he knew from an early age he was headed for college. He studied zoology and cell development at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., and worked as a biochemist studying cells at Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts. He became a biology instructor at Howard University before finishing his Ph.D., and would spend 20 summers also working at Woods Hole. From 1920 to 1931 he was awarded a biology fellowship by the National Research Council. Just pioneered research into cell fertilization, division, hydration and the effects of carcinogenic radiation on cells.

Frustrated that no major American university would hire him because of racism, Just relocated to Europe in 1930. Once there, he wrote the bulk of his 70 professional papers, as well as two books. He died of pancreatic cancer in 1941 [sources: BiographyGeneticsGwinnet County Public Schools].

2. Patricia Bath

Patricia Bath improved the vision of generations thanks to her invention for cataract treatment.

Born in 1942, Bath’s educational achievements began early. She graduated high school in only two years, then earned a bachelor’s degree from Hunter College and a medical degree from Howard University before accepting an ophthalmology fellowship at Columbia University. It was during this fellowship that Bath’s research uncovered some staggering statistics: When compared with her other patients, blacks were eight times more likely to develop glaucoma and twice as likely to go blind from it. She set her sights on developing a process to increase eye care for people unable to pay, now called community ophthalmology, which operates worldwide. Bath became the first African-American to complete a residency in ophthalmology in 1973, and the first woman to join the ophthalmology department at UCLA in 1975.

By 1981, Bath was hard at work on her most notable invention, a laser probe that precisely treated cataracts with less pain to the patient. Using the laserphaco probe she devised, she was able to restore sight to patients who had been blind for as long as 30 years. In 1988, she became the first black female doctor to receive a patent for a medical purpose. Since her retirement in 1993, Bath continues to advocate for the medically underserved and has focused on the use of technology to offer medical services in remote regions [source: Biography].

3. Marie Maynard Daly

Marie Maynard Daly was a pioneer in the study of the effects of cholesterol and sugar on the heart and the first black woman to earn a Ph.D. in chemistry in the United States. She was born in 1921, at a time when minority women often were denied educational and employment opportunities, but she didn’t allow prejudice to stop her pursuit of the sciences. By 1942, she had earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry with honors from Queens College in New York. She went on to complete a master’s degree, also in chemistry, just one year later.

It was while earning her doctoral degree from Columbia University that Daly’s research really began to gel. She discovered how internally produced compounds help digestion and spent much of her career as a professor researching cell nuclei. Importantly, she discovered the link between high cholesterol and clogged arteries, which helped advance the study of heart disease. She also studied the effects of sugar on arteries, and cigarette smoking on lung tissue. Daly established a scholarship fund for black students at Queens College in 1988. She died in 2003 [sources: African-American Pioneers in ScienceChemical Heritage Foundation].

4. David Harold Blackwell

David Harold Blackwell was one of the world’s most notable statisticians, but as a child he didn’t particularly like math. That was until he met the right teacher who opened a numerical world to him.

Blackwell, born in 1919, grew up in southern Illinois and by 16 was enrolled at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. At 22, he graduated from his home state university with a doctoral degree in mathematics and then studied at Princeton. Although Blackwell aspired to a teaching position, racial bias closed doors; he was denied posts at Princeton and at the University of California at Berkeley. However, he was offered a position at Howard University. (Berkeley later offered Blackwell a teaching job, and he became the university’s first black tenured professor in 1954).

While at Howard, Blackwell studied game theory and how it applied to decision-making in the government and private sectors during summers at RAND Corp. He became the United States’ leading expert on the subject, authoring a widely respected textbook on game theory, as well as research that resulted in several theorems named for him. One such theory, which explains how to turn rough guesses into on-target estimates, is known as the Rao-Blackwell theorem and remains an integral part of modern economics. In 1965, he became the first African-American to be inducted into the National Academy of Sciences. He died in 2010 [sources: SandersSorkin].

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(via thedragoninmygarage)

The problem with assaults on women isn’t that lots of women don’t know martial arts or other self-defense tactics, but that lots of men think it’s acceptable to assault women. And that comes from deeply engrained social attitudes that need to be addressed before we can move forward as a society, because otherwise, we’re going to keep coming back to the same busted building blocks. Telling women to learn self-defense creates a feedback loop — because women need self-defense to protect themselves from men, who thus escape responsibility for the fact that they’re assaulting women, and keep doing it because no efforts are made to change the way they view, talk about, and interact with women, which means women need to learn self-defense to protect themselves from assault. Women Don’t Need Self-Defense: Men Need to Stop Assaulting Women | this ain’t livin’ (via brutereason)

(via brutereason)

thefemme-menace:

horrorproportions:

sluttybastard:

honduranthunder:

onlyblackgirl:

miss-afro-ninja:

bubblegumrebel:

FUCK

iggy has NOTHING on nicki 

LOL remember when the music fucked up with Iggy and she just stood there helpless. Yeah, try to tell me again she on Nicki’s level.

This my bitch for real. I’m not even a huge Nicki fan but then she pulls shit like this and remember how fuckin raw she is. 

shes the bhaddest. hands down

And I queued it for later to so ya’ll can enjoy it for a second time. I’m so nice

YAAAAAASSSSSSSSSSS

(via faysbook)

astronomifier:

rachelhaimowitz:

obsessionisaperfume:

deadcatwithaflamethrower:

queensimia:

palavenblues:

holy shit there is a name for it

Well damn. Explains a lot.

Suddenly I understand some of my fan base a LOT better.  That is Awesome. 

"holy shit there is a name for it" was my reaction before I even scrolled down to the comments.

I just need to keep reblogging this because I cannot even begin to tell you how profound a feeling of YES and THIS and THERE IS A WORD FOR ME OMG I get every time I see this, and I hope it helps others too.

seriously, anytime you see a post with a comment saying “theres a name for it?!” reblog that post because even if it doesnt apply to you any of your followers could be waiting for that revelation.

astronomifier:

rachelhaimowitz:

obsessionisaperfume:

deadcatwithaflamethrower:

queensimia:

palavenblues:

holy shit there is a name for it

Well damn. Explains a lot.

Suddenly I understand some of my fan base a LOT better.  That is Awesome. 

"holy shit there is a name for it" was my reaction before I even scrolled down to the comments.

I just need to keep reblogging this because I cannot even begin to tell you how profound a feeling of YES and THIS and THERE IS A WORD FOR ME OMG I get every time I see this, and I hope it helps others too.

seriously, anytime you see a post with a comment saying “theres a name for it?!” reblog that post because even if it doesnt apply to you any of your followers could be waiting for that revelation.

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

When men imagine a female uprising, they imagine a world in which women rule men as men have ruled women.

Sally Kempton

It’s been apparent to me for a while that most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted.

I cannot decide whether this shows how unimaginative they are, or shows how aware they must be of what they do in order to so deeply fear having it turned on them. (via lepetitmortpourmoi)

"Most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted." (via misandry-mermaid)

(via cocoslucifera)

"The Potter Books are Radical"

phoenix-ace:

Its hard for me to take that seriously.  I get why someone might agree with that, but I just can’t.  After watching someone say that Harry Potter made it easier for them to see what was wrong with situations like Ferguson, I get really frustrated by shit like this.  

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elfyourmother:

let me repeat that for the cheap seats in this fandom:

your fandom space cannot be “LGBT friendly” if it is unsafe for PoC.

your video game company cannot be “LGBT friendly” if it is dismissive at best to players of color concerns.

your tie-in novel cannot be “LGBT representation!” if you devote page after page to colorism and your vaunted gay relationship is full of racism and colorism.

PoC are LGBT too.

(via homunculilith)

Album Art

turnthatcherry:

gurt-squirt:

sounds like some serious final boss music

she needs to use this as the intro for the next tour

(via stopwhitepeopleforever)

ArtistBeyonce (Cover by chonthenomad)
TitlePartition (Orchestral Arrangement)